What’s In a Name? Part 1: Herstory and Eve – Thematic Analysis of Her Story

Warning: this series contains HEAVY SPOILERS for the game. If you don’t want to know who killed Simon, get outta here while you still can!

Disclaimer: my interpretation of the game is based on Hannah and Eve being twin sisters, not two personalities in the same body. #sorrynotsorry

You may remember from last week that one of my favorite Let’s Play channels, Geek Remix, recently played Her Story. After watching a few minutes of gameplay, I knew I wanted in on this, and I can tell you the game doesn’t disappoint. A non-linear, story-based game, the player combs through interview footage of Hannah Smith from a police investigation into the death of her husband Simon. The videos are archived based on their transcripts, so searching any keyword will bring up clips where the term is used. (When you begin, the first suggestion is ‘murder.’)

Written by Sam Barlow, the same person who brought us Silent Hill: Shattered Memories, the game conjures a similar mood and aesthetic while doing something that feels very new. It handles theme, allusion, and symbolism so well that I decided to write a three-part analysis of the names used in the game. Woo! Watch the video below, or read on for more.

Let’s start with the title, shall we?

Herstory

‘Herstory’ is history told from the feminist perspective, a reaction to male-dominated accounts of past events, many of which do not acknowledge the differing experiences of women or the patriarchal values society held at that time.

While the term ‘herstory’ has many connotations depending on its context, at its core it refers to a woman’s side of the story, which is a particularly apt way to refer to the game’s account of Simon’s death. By alluding to and then subverting traditional historical and mythological tales, Her Story allows its female characters to speak for themselves and tells a different, more explicit and nuanced story of female persistence, survival, and ultimately freedom.

Eve

Of course, the title is not the only meaningful name in the story. Almost every character’s name is biblically, historically, or mythologically significant in some way. The most obvious connection the game makes to the Hebrew Bible is Eve, Hannah’s twin sister. She has a tattoo of a serpent wrapped around an apple, a clear reference to Adam’s wife and the first woman created by God, who ate fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil and shared it with her husband. Her name means ‘living’ or ‘life source.’

Hannah’s sister Eve is obviously not the first human woman in existence in the universe of Her Story, but she seems to be the first person the detectives interview about Simon (although they believe she is Hannah at the time). As in the Bible, Eve discovers and disseminates knowledge of ‘good and evil,’ or in this case, of the twins lives and who is guilty of Simon’s murder. But the Biblical Eve is commonly perceived as an emblem of female weakness and the evils of temptation and knowledge, and our Eve is not so cut and dry.

It’s never made clear whether Eve was responsible for the deaths around her (Florence, the twins’ parents, and maybe even Hannah’s baby), whether they were prompted by knowledge that Hannah, and then later the detectives, did not have: the knowledge that Eve and Hannah are sisters. But we do know Eve did not murder Simon and is not expelled from her paradise because of her pursuit of knowledge.

In fact her curiosity allows her to escape her physical confinement by Florence and later by Hannah. Telling her story allows her to exist as an individual in a way she never could before, and to be acknowledged not just by the detectives, but by anyone who views her interviews. Her Story subverts the traditional narrative by allowing Eve’s side of the story to be heard and shared.

her story

First time posting in-depth analysis or making a video! What do you think? Would you like more of this? What interested you most about Her Story? Let me know in the comments!

Part 2 of this series is up now! Check it out!

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3 thoughts on “What’s In a Name? Part 1: Herstory and Eve – Thematic Analysis of Her Story

  1. Pingback: What’s In a Name? Part 2: Hannah and Sisterhood – Thematic Analysis of Her Story | Rated C for Critical Consumption

  2. Pingback: What’s In a Name? Part 3: Conclusion – Thematic Analysis of Her Story | Rated C for Critical Consumption

  3. Pingback: Highlights of 2015 | Rated C for Critical Consumption

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